Katy Perry Channels Piet Mondrian in New Music Video

Katy Perry, aspiring art collector, has a new music video out for her latest single “This Is How We Do,” and it’s surprisingly artsy, heavily referencing Piet Mondrian.

The video opens with an old man sitting in front of a portrait of Perry hung in an art gallery, zooming in on the photo to reveal the singer attired as a modish 1960s-style housewife. Later in the song, Perry wears a shiny two-piece take on Yves Saint Laurent’s “Mondrian” day dress with matching shoes and hair, and dances in front of a blown up version of one of his color-blocked grid paintings. (This is not the first musical project to reference the De Stijl art movement, of which Mondrian was a leading member: the movement lent its name to the While Stripes’ second album.)

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The video is a confusing melange of cartoon animations (including a twerking ice cream cone), people floating around, paper food, and of course, Perry’s trademark wigs and over-the-top costumes. Most of the video is shot in front of a flat blue backdrop, which sometimes masquerades as a cloudy sky or the bottom of a swimming pool.

For some reason, there’s a hologram of Mariah Carey and a shot of Aretha Franklin in her infamous presidential inauguration hat. Perry also “gets her nails did all Japanesey” from Pee-wee Herman–suited backup dancer manicurists while sitting in an Arrested Development-style hand chair, a concept supposedly invented by Mexican artist and designer Pedro Friedeberg. Is is all some contemporary-art fueled hallucination on the part of the anonymous gallery goer from the video’s opening?

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Perhaps the 29-year-old pop star was inspired by her well-known collaborations with Will Cotton (as artnet News reported, she was spotted taking a selfie with her portrait of her at the National Gallery), or her recent contribution to an album by artist Mark Ryden. Whatever the reason, Perry clearly has art on the brain.

by Sarah Cascone

Source: Artnet News

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Augmented Reality Mondrian – Keep your Smartphone in your Pocket!

An inverted Mondrian by J. Robert Feld. Photo courtesy the artist, via Fast Co. Design.
An inverted Mondrian by J. Robert Feld.
Photo courtesy the artist, via Fast Co. Design.

Artist J. Robert Feld noticed something that if you’ve been to a gallery or art museum recently, you’ve probably seen too. “People rush through a museum, like a scavenger hunt, capturing images in their devices, as if that’s an appropriate substitute for pausing and contemplating the work,” he told Fast Co. Design. This invasion of technology in a formerly tech-free zone inspired him, ironically, to create a series of paintings that actually require the viewer to look at them through the lens of a smartphone in order to properly experience the work.

Feld’s “Mondrian Inverted: The Viewer Is Not Present” series features reproductions of Piet Mondrian‘s famed geometric compositions with inverted color schemes. In order to see the paintings with their intended colors, one must look at them through the function on an iPhone or Android that allows for the inversion of colors. He chose Mondrian because his work is both aesthetically pleasing and widely known, and his use of primary colors also makes the contrast between the inverted and intended colors stark. (…)

Though a bit gimmicky, the point resonates. The ubiquity of smartphones and social media apps dedicated to photo sharing has made it almost impossible to do, look at, or experience anything even somewhat remarkable without feeling the urge to whip out that device and capture it, even at the expense of enjoying the moment for what it is. (…) Though a bit gimmicky, the point resonates. The ubiquity of smartphones and social media apps dedicated to photo sharing has made it almost impossible to do, look at, or experience anything even somewhat remarkable without feeling the urge to whip out that device and capture it, even at the expense of enjoying the moment for what it is.

by Cait Munro

Source: Artnet News

Live in Piet Mondrian’s artist’s studio and flat in Hampstead

The Victorian artist’s studio and flat that was lived in by the Dutch Modernist artist Piet Mondrian is available for rent.

  Studio room at Parkhill Road

Studio room at Parkhill Road

Mondrian moved to London from Paris in 1938 to escape the rise of fascism across Europe and made this one-bedroom flat on Parkhill Road in Belsize Park his studio and home.

The apartment backs onto the famous Mall Studios, where Barbara Hepworth and her husband Ben Nicholson lived before moving to St Ives in 1939. Sculptor Henry Moore then moved in.

Paul Glass, lettings manager at Day Morris, said: “There’s nothing above the studio room, so you’ve got that wonderful high ceiling. It looks over the Mall Studios, which was built for artists to be a community, and all the other artists who lived in the area would pop in on each other.

“There are still arty people living in the houses, because of their history. There’s a well-known composer living there now, for example.”

The blue plaque outside the building
The blue plaque outside the building

Mondrian was one of the most important artists of the 20th century and is best known for his paintings composed of blocks of primary colours on white grounds, intersected by black lines, which are often likened to the grids of modern cities.

According to Hepworth, the Hampstead studio came to look like one of these paintings as squares of primary colours climbed up the white walls.

The wood panelling, which was previously painted black, has been restored and the apartment has access to a private garden, as well as its own separate entrance, and tenants will have the distinction of their very own blue plaque.

The studio is available to let from Day Morris for £450 per week.

The studio from the outside
The studio from the outside

by Prudence Ivey

Source: Ham & High Property

A playground as a Mondrian’s painting

Between two buildings of the ninth district of Paris, the basketball court of the Duperré street was renovated and primped into a work of art dedicated to the practice of the orange ball.

Mondrian as if reborn from its ashes to exchange the support of the canvas against a basketball court. In all fairness, the newly renovated playground of 22, rue Duperré, the Parisian neighborhood of Pigalle, is a gem in terms of street art. Getting a first time in 2009, the site has been enhanced with cubic forms – recalling the gridded compositions of red, yellow, blue and white of the artist – which are superimposed curves fixing the center circle and firing lines.

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