Post-Impressionism in Verona – Mondrian’s Place in a Long Line of Tradition

Vincent Van Gogh, Il seminatore 17 - 28 giugno 1888 ca. Olio su tela, 64,2x80,3 cm Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands © Collection Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands.
Vincent Van Gogh, Il seminatore 17 – 28 giugno 1888 ca. Olio su tela, 64,2×80,3 cm Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands © Collection Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands.

The exhibition Seurat, Van Gogh, Mondrian. Post-Impressionism in Europe, a European preview held Verona, features 70 incredible masterpieces from the Kröller-Müller Museum in Otterlo including the renowned Self-Portrait (1887) of Van Gogh, Sunday at Port-en-Bessin (1888) by Seurat, The Dining Room (1886–87) by Signac and Composition with Red, Yellow and Blue (1927) by Mondrian.

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The last section of the exhibition is devoted to the radical stance of Piet Mondrian, who completed the move to abstraction in the years of World War I by dividing the canvas into rectangles of colour. The four historic work on show date from 1913 on: Composition no. II (1913), Composition in Colour B (1917), Composition with Grid 5: Lozenge, Composition in Colour (1919) and Composition with Red, Yellow and Blue (1927).

The exhibition recounts how Post-Impressionism, born in the wake of Impressionism, gathered together all of the many developments in figurative art in the closing years of the 19th century in Europe. As photography began to blossom, painting took a very different course and abandoned the idea of perfect realism as the ideal objective of art. Painting had to seek its own specific path.

Post-Impressionism was not an authentic style in the strict sense but gathered together artists forced at a certain point in their experience to address the problem of reproduction. As a result, their tools became a way of communicating something rather than representing it.

In the space of just a few decades, this approach led to authentic revolutions in the field of art with the birth of the early avant-garde movements.

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